Performance Studies Current Courses

Overview

Catalog
(extended abstracts at bottom of page)

Spring 2020

SOC 295 – Sociology of the Body (and embodiment), Maxine Craig

NAS 224 / PFS 265C -Performance in the Americas, Zoila Mendoza

CRI 200C – Media and (New) Materialism, Tim Lenoir

ART 290 – Developing language around your individual art practice, Darrin Martin

CRD 249 – Innovative Media and Community Development, Jesse Drew

PFS 265D – Theories of Performance, Jon Rossini, M 2:10 – 5, Wright 222

Winter 2020

AHI 250 – Topics in Art History on cultural heritage, war and conflict

NAS 202 – Indigenous Ecological Law and Policy

PFS 265B – Practice and Research, Joe Dumit

PFS 265C – Oppositional Performance and Social Movements, Larry Bogad, W 2-5

Fall 2019

AHI 200A – Visual Theory is designed for graduate students in art history or any discipline with an interest in visual studies, Heghnar Watenpaugh

PFS 200 - Methods, Materials and Performance Research, Lynette Hunter, M 2:10 – 5

ANT 210 – Fieldwork in Art History (aesthetic anthropology), Tarik Elhaik

PFS 265A – Modes of Production: Game/Design/Philosophy, Stephanie Boluk and Patrick Lemieux, W 3:10 – 6, 201 Sprocket

DRA 252 – Time / Space / Place, Peter Lichtenfels, T / R 2:10 – 4

Spring 2019

Edu 292 (CRN 92612) – “Experiential Learning”,Cary Trexler, Th 1:10-4, Academic Surge 2377

PFS 265D –“Queer Performance: Histories and Theories”, Elizabeth Freeman, Th 3:10 – 6, 308 Voorhies

STS 205 (CRN 92999, counts as PFS 265B) – “Bodies, Embodiments, Affects, Movements”, Joe Dumit, W 2:10 – 5, SSH 1246

SOC 295 – “Health, Culture, and Inequalities”, Ming-Cheng Lo,2269 SSH Bldg 2269.

DRA 251 – “Scripting and Scoring”

SOC 295 –“Buy-ology: Culture, Environment and the Sociology of Consumption”, Rafi Grosglik,W 9:00 – 11:50 AM, Social Science & Humanities Rm 1291

 

 

 
 

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Winter 2019

PFS 259 (CRN 46351) –“Contemporary Performance”Margret Kemp, M 2:10-5pm, Wright

PFS 265C –“Performance and Society” Fiamma Montezemolo, M 3-6pm Della

ANT 206 –“Grant Writing”  Joe Dumit, Wed 2-5p, SSH 1246

MUS 223– “Topics in Ethnomusicology: Music and (Bodily) Movement” Henry Spiller, T 1:10 – 4:00 pm, Everson 266

German 297 ( CRN 37017)–“Life Writing Graphic Novels and the Holocost” Elizabeth  Kramer T 2:10-5pm, 109 Olson Hall

STS 250 (CRN 55382)–“Faciality “K. Ravetto-Biagioli, T 12:10-3:00

ENG290F– “Creative Writing: Ficition” Lucy Corin,Thrs 12:10-3pm, 120 Voorhies

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Fall 2018

PFS 265 B – Signification and the Body, Maxine Craig

CST 210 (CRN 43098) / HMR 200B (CRN 43145) – Memory, Culture, and Human Rights

PFS298 (CRN 34660) – “Performance Writing” Jon Rossini. W 10a-12p Wright 222

PFS/STS 298 –“Critical and Creative Embodiment: Practicing Research and Researching Practice,” Joe Dumit Tue 2-5p, Wright 222

Comp. Lit. 210 (CRN 16710) “Chinese Cinema”, Sheldon Lu R 2:10-5:00P, 3 Wellman Hall

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Spring 2018

PFS 265 B – Signification and the Body, Maxine Craig

MUS 221 – Topics in Music History, Carol Hess

MUS 223 – Ethnomusicology, Juan Diego Diaz

CRI 200C – Sovereignty, Kriss Ravetto

FMS 125 – Epic Television: The Golden Age of TV? Jaimey Fisher

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Winter 2018

GER 241 –  The German Drama: The Anti-Aristotelian Tradition, Gail Finney

MUS 210C – Proseminar in Ethnomusicology, Henry Spiller

AHI 190/290 – Cultural Heritage in Wartime Professor Watenpaugh

CRD 249  – Innovative Media and Community Development  Jesse Drew

PFS 259 – Trans Feminist Performance: Queering Ecology Jean Vaccaro

PFS 259 – Voice For Performance Margaret Kemp

PFS 259 – First Person: Embodiment and Performativity in Virtual Reality, Patrick LeMieux

STS 298 – TRANSPLANT/QUIMERA ROSA.

CDM 163 – Between the White Cube and the Black Box Fiamma di Montezemolo

PFS 265A (CRI 200C) – History of Critical Theory, Kriss Ravetto-Biagioli

EN 290 – Creative Writing: Hybrid Writing Practices Corin, Lucy

PFS 265C (NAS 224) – Performance in the Americas Zoila Mendoza

EDU 230 – Critical Race Theory in Education, Patricia Quijada

WMS 201 – Feminist Science and Democracy.  Sara Giordano

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Fall 2017

GER297 – Graduate Film Studies; The Case of Cinema in Germany, Fisher

ENL 280:–Digitizing the Early Modern M 12:10-3:00 PM

MUS 210B – Proseminar in Musicology/Criticism, Beth Levy

PFS 298 Sec. 10 (CRN: 54493)– Performance Writing, Jon D. Rossini,W 12:10-2:00 PM Wright 222 CRN: 54493

DES 225 – Studio Practice in Design, Glenda Drew, M 9-11:50 AM Cruess Hall 256

AHI 200A – Visual Theory, Professor Watenpaugh,TR 3:10-6 PM

STS 200 – Theories and Methods in Science and Technology Studies, Colin Milburn,T 9 AM-12 PM STS Seminar Room (SS&H 1246)

REL 230F–Visual, Cultural, Media Technology Circulation of Culture: South Asian Documentary Cinema, Gargi Sen W 3:10-6:00

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Spring 2017

WMS 200B 001 – Feminist Research – Rana Jaleel

MUS 221 – Music and Nature/Ecomusicology – Beth Levy

FMS ??? – Graduate Film Studies: The Case of Cinema in Germany  – Jaimey Fisher

DRA 158 – Tactical Performance – Lawrence Bogad

Winter 2017

PFS 259 / DRA 253 – Larry Bogad – Approaches to Collaboration: Performance of Non-Fiction – Wed 10-12:50pm

PFS / DRA 265A –  Lynette Hunter –  M 2:10 – 5, Wright 220

PFS 259 –   Gina Bloom –  Theorizing Media and Performance – W 2:10 – 5, 248 Voorhies

GSW 200A – Feminist Theory – Wendy Ho

GSW  – Beth Freeman (ENL) –

CRI 200A – Kris Fallon (CDM) – Approaches to Critical Theory –  Wednesdays, 2:10-5:00pm

ANT 210 – Cristiana Giordano (ANT) – Affect and Representation

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Fall 2016

PFS 200 – Fiamma Montezemolo (CDM) – (Core) Methods and Matters – Tue 2:10 – 5 PM

ANT 210 – Joseph Dumit (STS/ANT) & Joe Masco – Conspiracy/Theory – Wed 12:10-3 PM

ANT 201 – Tarek Elhaik (ANT) – Reading Ethnography – Wed 9-11:50 AM

GER 262 – Gail Finney – Studies in Turn-of-the-Century Culture – Wed 2-5 PM

CST 204 – Christina Perez (visiting scholar) – History and Theory of Sexualities

Art History 200A -Heghnar Watenpaugh – Visual Theory – Wed 2:10-5 PM

ANT ??? – Cristiana Giordano, Greg Perotti – Research, Narrative, and Performance – Weekends (see below)

SOC 292a -Laura Grindstaff – Field Methods – Wed 3:10-6pm

ENL 262 -Danielle Heard – Lady Sings the Blues: Blues, Literature, and Black Feminism

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Winter 2016

PFS 259 – Lynette Hunter – Contemporary Performance

PFS 265C – Larry Bogad – Performance and Society

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Fall 2015

PFS 200 –  Lynette Hunter – Methods and Materials in Theatre Research

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Spring 2015

PFS 265B – Maxine Craig – Signification and Body

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Winter 2015

PFS 265A – Lynette Hunter- Modes of Production

PFS 259 – Larry Bogad – Contemporary Performance

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Abstracts

Spring 2019

Edu 292 (CRN 92612) Experiential Learning,Cary Trexler, Th 1:10-4, Academic Surge 2377. This course focuses on historical and contemporary philosophical, theoretical, and practical perspectives related to experiential learning in formal and non-formal settings.  The course is targeted at those who are interested in how to design experiences that promote affective, psychomotor, and cognitive learning. Specifically, the course is designed for those who are interested in designing authentic learning experiences for school aged and adult learners in such settings as: environmental outdoor camps, Farmer Field Schools, science museums, short and long term agricultural extension trainings, and K-12 classrooms.  After reviewing the philosophical and theoretical foundations of experiential learning, student in this course will design, develop, and teach experienced-rich lessons related to their interests to others in the course.

Cary Trexler worked as a high school agriculture, biology and health teacher in California and Vermont early in his career.  He also served as a school administrator in Michigan for an elementary science education program that used food, agriculture, renewable resources, and the environment as a context for instruction. Cary also has extensive experience working in international development contexts designing and implementing agricultural and environmental extension programs that engage people in experiences that promote behavioral change.

SOC 295 Buy-ology: Culture, Environment and the Sociology of Consumption, Rafi Grosglik,W 9:00 – 11:50 AM, Soc.Humanities Rm 1291.

This course explores the ways in which consumption was formed as a major source of identity and citizenship, and as a driving force of global, local and national politics and economies. We will analyze the appearance and development of consumer society(ies), namely the social spheres in which the accumulation of material goods has become extremely important for individuals and the larger culture. A general aim of this course is to facilitate students’ grasp of how major works in sociology of consumption and material culture can help us think about the conceptualization and analysis of notions such as: consumer culture, ethical consumption, global commodity chain, the social life of things, cultural consumption, shared economy, green consumption and anti-consumption. The course will begin by offering a theoretical overview of the relationship between social structure and consumption patterns. Following that, we will consider sociological critiques of global capitalist production. Through engagement with theories of sociology of consumption, we will ask what role consumerism plays in the societies from both the Global North and the Global South. We will learn how possession of goods, commodities and technologies intersect with class, gender, ethnic and national hierarchies, desires and values. Next, we will discuss how social inequality and environmental problems might be related to consumption. We will also consider the ethics and politics surrounding consumption patterns and examine issues related to consumer activism and ethical consumption.Goals and Aims:A major aim of this course is to facilitate the efforts of graduate students in sociology (as well as geography, environmental studies, anthropology or, indeed, any field) who are interested in critical engagement in studies of consumption and material culture. The course also has a more practical aim – to help graduate students make progress toward their immediate goals, including: preparing for qualifying exams and advancing their own research. To this end, as a final assignment, students will write a synthetic essay on a topic of their choosing. Graduate students in this course will be encouraged to take an active part in a one-day symposium on Wednesday, April 26th at UC Davis on markets, movements and the politics of commodities.

SOC 295 “Health, Culture, and Inequalities”, Ming-Cheng Lo,2269 SSH Bldg 2269. This seminar focuses on several key theoretically-informed questions in medical sociology, including: what are the dynamics of domination and power in the social field of healthcare? How is medicalization a form of social control? How are racial, gender, or class disparities reproduced or challenged in health-related policies and practices? How do illness experiences affect individuals’ – and their caretakers’ – identities?

We start with an investigation of the macro-historical contexts in which medicine achieved professional dominance in the US and, subsequently, healthcare became an expanding network of market-driven industry. We continue our discussion of macro forces of domination as we examine the regulatory power of the “medical gaze.” We then shift our attention to how meso-level social forces, in particular race, class, ethnicity, and gender, produce and reproduce health disparities, as these factors influence access to care, individuals’ social environment and “habitus,” doctor-patient interactions, etc. Also relevant here is the question of how and why the workforce of healthcare itself is stratified. We finish the quarter with an analysis of how individuals experience and narrate their health problems outside of the clinic – in their lifeworlds and with their own voices. Both as patients and caregivers, women and men endeavor to draw upon elements from their cultural repertoires to construct narratives about their (or their spouses’ or children’s) health problems – narratives that help them to make sense of how the illness is interrupting their identities and how they envision their future social selves.

Two groups of graduate students can potentially benefit from this course: those who are interested in medical sociology/anthropology and the sociology of health and illness, and the students who do not self-identify as medical sociologists but are interested in exploring the theoretical issues raised in the seminar.

PFS 265D Queer Performance: Histories and Theories, Elizabeth Freeman, Th 3:10 – 6, 308 Voorhies. This course will sample a broad historical range of performance traditions that might conceivably be called “queer”: cross-dressing on the Early Modern English stage; 19th century minstrelsy; early 20th century Harlem cabaret; 1950s camp; 1980s vogue/ballroom culture; late 20th century trans* beauty pageants, 2000s karaoke, and global contemporary transgender performance.   We will look at these performance traditions through primary works of literature, film, and performance recording, alongside of critical readings that analyze the traditions themselves in terms of queer performance theory, and/or alongside of more general explorations of queer performance and performativity theory.  Students will present an “embodied critical act” of one reading once during the quarter, and may choose either a traditional final paper or a performance project with an accompanying analytic piece of writing explaining their performance and its relation to course materials. Readings TBA, as this course was reassigned to this instructor only very recently, but critics/theorists are likely to include Judith Butler, Joshua Chambers-Letson, Eric Lott, Martin Manalansan, José Esteban Muñoz, Esther Newton, Marcia Ochoa, Eve Sedgwick, and others.

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Winter 2019 Abstracts

PFS 265C “Performance and Society” Fiamma Montezemolo, M 3-6pm Della. In this seminar we will try to answer a series of key questions revolving around the relation between Performance and Society, with a special focus on the second term and its actual or in/actual conceptual relevance. What is a ‘society’? Is the ‘social’ something given, inalterable, contingent, tangible? What are those activities that are deemed to have a ‘social dimension’? Is the Social something that has kept its intrinsic meaning unchanged over time? Is the social a dimension exclusively pertaining to the human? And can society be ‘defended’? How is society related to politics and control? Moreover, what is the relation between society and community? We will attempt to engage these questions through a series of key texts by T.Bender, M.Foucault, G.Deleuze, A.Mbembe, C.Bishop, T.Rees, B.Latour, N.Rose, S.O’Sullivan as well as artists case studies including Teresa Margolles, Tania Bruguera, Pierre Huyghe, Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, and the collective Postcommodity.

STS 250 (CRN 55382): “Faciality “K. Ravetto-Biagioli, T 12:10-3:00. With the invention of photography, cinema, and computational media the face has come to signify intensity and power (Deleuze), the bearing of the soul (Balasz), individuality (Lacan), truth, beauty, ideas (Barthes), and interiority as well as the most basic support of intersubjectivity (Levinas). Yet contemporary facial technologies allow us to inhabit other people’s faces and to modify our own. This course will examine the how the history of perception has been entangled with the image (eidolon) of the face, haptics (Descartes), and the neural processing of emotions, examining how the face came to be considered the interface between reception and expression. The course will consider how optical and visual technologies have transformed the way we think about and interact with the face. Readings from Plato, Kepler, Descartes, Darwin, Galton, Duchenne, Münsterberg, Balasz, Levinas, Flusser, Ekman, Deleuze and Guattari, Doane, Steimatzky, Gates, Galloway, Pearl, etc.).

German 297 ( CRN 37017)“Life Writing Graphic Novels and the Holocost” Elizabeth Kramer T 2:10-5pm, 109 Olson Hall. This course examines the genre of life writing in the context of the Holocaust with particular attention to graphic novels. We will discuss texts on the genre of life writing (Thomas Couser), on the representation of the Holocaust (James Young), on the Holocaust and gender (Marianne Hirsch), and on graphic novels (McCloud). Texts to be discussed include Ruth Klüger’s Still Alive, Art Spiegelman’s Maus, Miriam Katin’s Letting It Go, Barbara Yelin’s Irmina, and Nora Krug’s Heimat. Knowledge of German not required. All texts are available in English.

MUS 223: “Topics in Ethnomusicology : Music and (Bodily) Movement” Henry Spiller, :10 – 4:00 pm, Everson 266. The modernist category of “music” is a disembodied thing–purely aural and mental, curiously disconnected from the gestural and physical phenomena that invariably accompany its sounds. This seminar explores approaches for examining how music encompasses human bodily movements. Through readings and discussions (and even occasional in-class moving) we will interrogate the conceptual boundaries erected between movement and music, explore the role of physical gestures in creating music, look at ways in which music suggests gestures, and examine how (disembodied) music accompanies aestheticized movement forms such as dance, marching, martial arts, film/video, and even (if somebody insists) synchronized swimming.

ENG290F “Creative Writing: Ficition” Lucy Corin,Thrs 12:10-3pm, 120 Voorhies. This is a graduate level fiction writing workshop. Priority is given to graduate students in creative writing. Students from other programs are welcome, space permitting, and interested students should send a writing sample (fiction) when requesting permission to enroll. My approach privileges intensity and awareness of language textures and narrative shape, and asks each student to make each new work press the boundaries (intellectual, emotional, formal) of previous work. Making an immaculate-feeling piece of art is the ultimate goal, and we will work toward making your stories as beautiful as they can be, but I am less interested in you crafting pieces that conform to an “ideal form” than I am in you challenging yourself artistically. Revision is essential to this challenge. You are expected, therefore, to engage in revision, not in order to be “done” with a work, but to deepen and push at a work. Consistent, thorough attention to peer fictions both in writing and in discussion is required. This quarter we’ll compile a reader of short fictions that includes some drawn from enrolled students’ recent reading practices. We’ll also read a couple of short novels. Right now I’m thinking we’ll read Mary Robison’s /Why Did I Ever/ and Horacio Castellanos Moya’s /The Dream of My Return/.

Fall 2018 – Abstracts

CST 210 (CRN 43098)/HMR 200B (CRN 43145). MEMORY, CULTURE, & HUMAN RIGHTS Professor Lazzara Hart Hall 3114, Wednesdays 1:10-4 p.m.Although “memory” has been a topic for intellectual reflection since classical antiquity, it has experienced an upsurge in academia since the 1980s, particularly due to the rise of Holocaust Studies and the urgent need to reflect on gross human rights violations around the world. Crossing the social sciences and humanities, memory has become a category for critical inquiry as well as a political and ethical imperative that links intellectual reflection to political activism in the aftermath of authoritarian regimes, genocide, and situations of violence. Furthermore, “memory studies” now find spaces of institutional legitimacy in the U.S. and abroad as master’s programs and specialized journals promote scholarship in this area.

What are memory studies: an autonomous field, a space of inquiry that permits certain kinds of interdisciplinary work? What kinds of work can be done within the rubric of memory studies? What are the limits, drawbacks, and untapped potential of this framework? This course looks at the productivity of “memory” as a lens through which to do cultural studies work; in so doing, it explores the multiple convergences among memory, culture, and human rights. We will discuss how societal actors in different historical, cultural, and national settings construct meanings of past political violence, inter-group conflicts, and human rights struggles. We will also work to acquire the critical vocabulary that scholars working in this area regularly use.

Readings will mostly be theoretical or conceptual in nature, although we will also discuss a few “primary” texts derived largely from Latin America, an area in which memory studies have firmly taken root. Given the limited time we have in the seminar, primary texts will touch on the literary genres of fiction and testimony, although students are welcome to engage with other cultural objects—film, music, memorials, etc.—in their individual projects. Additionally, seminar participants will be encouraged to draw parallels to other contexts and geographies that are relevant to their individual research programs.

This course serves as one of the two core graduate seminars for the DE in Human Rights: https://humanrightsminor.ucdavis.edu/de.

Comparative Literature 210 Section 001. Chinese Cinema (4 units)Sheldon Lu R 2:10-5:00P 3 Wellman Hall CRN 16710. This quarter we focus on the rich cinematic traditions of China. We begin with early Chinese cinema and move all the way to the twenty-first century. Students will explore the themes, styles, aesthetics, stars, and socio-political contexts of particular films as well as the evolution of entire film industries. Representative directors and internationally renowned filmmakers will be discussed, such as Xie Jin, Zhang Yimou, Chen Kaige, Ang Lee, Jiang Wen, Feng Xiaogang, and Jia Zhangke. We examine Chinese cinema as an outgrowth of indigenous, national roots as well as a necessary response to international film culture. We look at how films engage in social critique and cultural reflection, and how film artists react to the conditions and forces of socialist politics, capitalist economy, tradition, modernization, and globalization in Chinese-speaking regions.Companion course to COM 180 for graduate students. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Comparative Literature, English, or a foreign-language literature, or consent of instructor (shlu@ucdavis.edu).

PFS 298 (CRN: 34659) “Critical and Creative Embodiment: Practicing Research and Researching Practice

As an anthropologist who studies the practice of research, I am very interested in “Practice as Research” (a term used in dance, art and performance work), “Research Creation” (in Canada and other places for the arts), and in general treating research as practice, and all practice as a type of research. Attending to practice indicates habits, sensitization, bodies, affects, embodiments, etc. Therefore my focus this fall is on how we practice (whoever joins the group is “we”) and whether that is the same as how we research (why, why not). One of the goals is that each of us learns more about what we do, and another is learning more how to talk about what we do, in terms of that are legible to others (for our future selves, for grants, for articles, and for collaborations).

There will be small readings each week to press upon these concepts and weekly practice and writing work – i really do believe that each style of writing (including academic) is a skill that gets better through practice and feedback.

Currently the class is scheduled for Tuesdays 2-5p. (I also have a slot Wed 12-3p that is possible). You sign up for it with the CRN 34659 – and let me know too so i can try to keep track. You have choose the credits and ideally you treat it as a 4-credit course.

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