Music

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Event

Daniel Stepner, violin
with Wayne Slawson, composer of computer music

Recital Hall, Ann E. Pitzer Center

J.S. Bach: Adagio from the Sonata for Solo Violin in C Major

Slawson: Open and A Motive from Mixed Doubles

Stepner: The Odyssey of the Chaconne

Violinist Daniel Stepner is the Artistic Director of the Aston Magna Festival and Foundation. He is also Professor Emeritus at Brandeis University, where he was first violinist of the Lydian String Quartet from 1987 to 2016. He was also a Preceptor in Music at Harvard University from 1993 to 2013, and Concertmaster of the Handel and Haydn Society from 1986 to 2009. His major teachers were Steven Staryk in Chicago, Nadia Boulanger in France, and Broadus Erle at Yale University, where he earned a Doctor of Musical Arts Degree. 

Selections from the Mixed Doubles recital program on Friday evening.

Free, no tickets necessary (a Shinkoskey Noon Concert)

Ann E. Pitzer Center, Davis, CA
Event

“Chills and Chuckles: the Unexpected and the Sublime”
Room 203, Music Building

Eric Moe, composer of what the New York Times has called “music of winning exuberance,” has received numerous grants and awards for his work, including the Lakond Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters and a Guggenheim Fellowship; commissions from the Fromm and Koussevitzky Foundations, the Barlow Endowment, Meet-the-Composer USA, and New Music USA; fellowships from the Wellesley Composer’s Conference and the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts; and residencies at MacDowell, Yaddo, Bellagio, Camargo, and the American Dance Festival, among others.

Tri-Stan, his one-woman opera on a text by David Foster Wallace, was hailed by the New York Times as “a tour de force” that “subversively inscribes classical music into pop culture.” A recording is available from Koch International Classics. Strange Exclaiming Music (Naxos) was described by Fanfare as “wonderfully inventive, often joyful, occasionally melancholy, highly rhythmic, frequently irreverent, absolutely eclectic, and always high-octane music.” Kick & Ride (bmop/sound) was a WQXR album of the week. Other all-Moe CDs are available on New World Records (Meanwhile Back At The Ranch), Albany Records (Of Color Braided All Desire, Kicking and Screaming, Up & At ‘Em, Siren Songs), and Centaur (On the Tip of My Tongue). He founded and currently co-directs Pittsburgh’s Music on the Edge new music concert series. Moe studied at Princeton University and UC Berkeley, and is currently the Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Music at the University of Pittsburgh. 

Free, a Valente Lecture

Music Building, Davis, CA
Event

“Combinations 2017″: Dan Stepner, violin, and Wayne Slawson, computer music
Recital Hall, Ann E. Pitzer Center

Electronic and computer music, no matter how attractively intricate and fascinating, presents a performance problem. It can be communicated privately from CD or internet connection to a small number of listeners, but for computer-music, “performance” is a kind of contradiction. The sense of shared occasion that draws audiences to concerts is hard to capture and maintain. Light shows, and other theatrical measures, can be attractive, but they tend to interfere with listeners who seek the auditory, somewhat abstract, pleasures of music for music’s sake.

This evening’s concert offers an alternative: a program of computer music presented with “live” performances from the solo-violin pieces of J.S. Bach. Slawson’s Mixed Doubles and the Bach pieces are both strongly sectional, suggesting their presentation more-or-less in alternation throughout the concert. Thus the program itself is “composed,” and to enhance the effects of this, we ask that the audience hold their applause until intermission.

 

Dan Stepner’s career is marked by unusual ideas and fresh approaches to a wide variety of music, new and old. His recordings include the Ives Violin and Piano Sonatas, with John Kirkpatrick; the late quartets of Beethoven, with the Lydian Quartet; and the J. S. Bach pieces for solo violin. 

Wayne Slawson is an Emeritus Professor of Music at UC Davis. His book, Sound Color, was awarded the first Outstanding Publication Award of the Society for Music Theory. His computer-synthesized works of “color music” are organized on the basis of equivalent treatment of pitch class and vowel-like sound color. 

$10 Students and Children, $20 Adults (Open Seating)

Ann E. Pitzer Center, Davis, CA
Event

Gamelan “Ledbo Budoyo”
Recital Hall, Ann E. Pitzer Center

The word gamelan is used in a similar way to our word orchestra. It refers to the Indonesian gong-chime ensembles of Java, Bali, and Sunda. This concert features music from the Central Javanese repertoire, collectively called karawitan, that has developed over centuries in the royal courts of Surakarta and Yogyakarta. Karawitan is still a living tradition in Java, modified and transformed by those who play it. 

Free, no tickets necessary (a Shinkoskey Noon Concert)

Ann E. Pitzer Center, Davis, CA
Event

Electronic Music at UC Davis
Recital Hall, Ann E. Pitzer Center

Music by undergraduate students, faculty member Bob Ostertag, and graduate student composer Phil Acimovic.

Speaking of Sound, by graduate student composer Phil Acimovic, is a sound installation that documents meaningful memories of sounds from our lives. The installation consists of speakers spread out across several rooms of the Pitzer Center. Visitors will walk through the space hearing recorded retellings of sonic stories. Through listening to these memories visitors will construct in their own minds the sounds described, perhaps triggering their own reminiscences as well. 

Free, no tickets necessary

Ann E. Pitzer Center, Davis, CA
Event

Hindustani Vocal Ensemble
Recital Hall, Ann E. Pitzer Center

Free, no tickets necessary

Ann E. Pitzer Center, Davis, CA 95616
Event

Jazz Combos of UC Davis
Recital Hall, Ann E. Pitzer Center

Free, no tickets necessary (a Shinkoskey Noon Concert)

Ann E. Pitzer Center, Davis, CA
Event

“Stereophonic methods, auditory histories, and paracolonial time: Hindustani music in the Indian Ocean, 1760–1860″
Room 266, Everson Hall

One of the biggest methodological challenges in writing the history of paracolonial soundworlds before the era of recorded sound is developing an ear for where sound might linger within and across radically differing archives. This challenge is compounded when one is seeking to connect archives that are multilingual, embodying multiple lineages of knowledge, and interregional, in this case dealing with the diverse cultural geographies of the eastern Indian Ocean c.1750–1900. The texture of the official colonial records of, say, the India Office in London is utterly distinct from those of the hundreds of rich treatises on Hindustani music from this era in India’s classical and vernacular languages, which themselves embody diverse genealogies of musical thought. But in the Malay world for the same period, under the same colonial rulers, there were no written works dedicated to music at all; instead, one must trawl the entire gamut of Malay and other regional literatures for sonic references, and think laterally about how to trace audibility and performativity in language itself. 

How can we use these differing colonial and paracolonial archives, and the idiosyncratic methods required to mine each one, to write cohesive, connected histories of music and sound in the eastern Indian Ocean—especially when the ephemeral object of our attention has long passed into silence? In this paper I will document the challenges and advantages of bringing varigated archives together—from both sides of the Bay of Bengal, and from colonial records and private papers to the manuscript and print cultures of the colonised—to produce an unprecedentedly stereophonic understanding of Hindustani soundworlds in the Indian Ocean c. 1760–1860. In so doing I aim to present one solution to the question of how we write histories of music and sound that take ethnomusicological method seriously.

Katherine Butler Schofield (King’s College, London) is a cultural historian and ethnomusicologist whose work focuses on South Asia. She trained as a viola player before embarking on postgraduate studies at SOAS in North Indian music, followed by a research fellowship at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, and a lectureship at Leeds.

Free

Everson Hall, Davis, CA

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