Music

Upcoming Events

Event

Voices of Spring
Recital Hall, Ann E. Pitzer Center

Students of Jonathan Nadel

with Ellen Deffner, piano

Works by Burleigh, J.S. Bach, Pasatieri, Saint-Saëns, de Falla, and others.

Free, no tickets necessary

Ann E. Pitzer Center, Davis, CA
Event

“Marian Devotion in Rome between Music, Liturgy and Art in the Seventeenth Century: The Music of Alessandro Melani for the Pauline Chapel in Santa Maria Maggiore”
Room 266, Everson Hall

The Pauline Chapel in the Basilica of Santa Maria Maggiore represents one of the more complex and significant ecclesiastical buildings in Counter-Reformation Rome. It was conceived as a relic venue and built to underline and reassert Catholic doctrine in response to the reforming zeal of Protestantism. The most important painting preserved in this Chapel is the Virgin of Saint Luke. According to tradition, it has legendary origins: drafted by the apostle Luke and completed by the angels. With the bull Immensae bonitas (1615) Pope Paul V asserted his belief in the Virgin’s strength as the merciful intercessor before Christ, an advocate for Christian souls, and an essential vehicle for salvation: all of these concepts are expressed in the text of the antiphon Salve Regina. The statutes of this Chapel were approved in 1615: The “Salve” services were committed to twelve musicians: ten singers, one organist and the chapel master. They sang litanies, antiphons, and the Compline for two choirs every Saturday night, at all feasts, and on the eves of Marian feasts. The earlier “Salve” music that has been preserved is that composed by Alessandro Melani (1639–1703), appointed director of the “Salve” from 1667 until his death. The music repertoire was written for two choirs and sung with one voice assigned to each part. The rhetorical scheme of the texts and their musical setting follows the ideological program of the bull issued by Pope Paul V. This music offers a systematic repertoire by a single composer for the most important Marian chapel of the Roman Counter-Reformation. The aim of this lecture is to underline the connections between Melani’s music and that religious and cultural context. I am convinced that this perspective of study, based on the intersection between visual art, architecture, liturgy, and music, represents an important way to achieve a broader knowledge of this complex cultural and religious message in Counter-Reformation Rome.

Luca Della Libera (b. 1961 in Milan) completed his music studies in Rome, Italy, where he graduated with a degree in  flute performance at the Conservatory of Santa Cecilia and in History of Music at the University La Sapienza, with Professor Pierluigi Petrobelli. Since 1998, Della Libera has been a tenured professor of History of Music at the Conservatory of Frosinone. From 1988 to 1991, he collaborated with IBIMUS (Istituto di Bibliografia Musicale) in the cataloguing of musical manuscripts in several Roman archives, such as Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore, Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano, and Biblioteca di Storia Moderna e contemporanea. His main field of research is music in Rome during the Baroque era, particularly sacred music, musical institutions, and archival studies. Della Libera has published articles in Nuova Rivista Musicale Italiana, Rivista italiana di musicologia, Recercare, Studi musicali, Acta musicologica, and Analecta musicologica. He published three volumes of critical editions of the sacred music of Alessandro Scarlatti for A-R Editions, and in 2014 a critical edition of the oratorio La Santissima Annunziata of Alessandro Scarlatti for the Istituto Italiano per la Storia della Musica. He also published several biographies for Dizionario Biografico degli Italiani and Musik in Geschichte und Gegenwart

Della Libera collaborates for recording and performing projects with some of the most esteemed Italian performers in Baroque music: Rinaldo Alessandrini and Concerto Italiano, Fabio Biondi and Europa Galante, the violinist Enrico Gatti, and Paolo Da Col with the ensemble Odhecaton. In 2012 and 2013, he held workshops and seminars at the Conservatory of Frosinone and Musikhoschule Bremen in collaboration with the soprano Gemma Bertagnolli on the sacred music of Alessandro Scarlatti. In February 2015, he was invited by the Birmingham Conservatory for an ‘Erasmus’ teaching exchange.

Since 1997, Della Libera has been a music critic for Il Messaggero, the most prominent newspaper in Rome. He received his PhD in musicology from the Università di Roma Tor Vergata in ‘co-tutelle’ with the Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz. His dissertation, “La musica sacra romana di Alessandro Scarlatti: testi, contesti, documents,” was given the distinction Magna cum laude. In February 2013, he was invited to give papers and lectures at Princeton University and Harvard University. He collaborates also with several Italian music institutions: Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, Accademia Filarmonica Romana, Accademia Chigiana (Siena), Teatro San Carlo di Napoli, Festival delle Nazioni, and Centro della Pietà dei Turchini di Napoli.

Free (a Valente Lecture)

Everson Hall, Davis, CA
Event

Jeremiah Trujillo, piano
Recital Hall, Ann E. Pitzer Center

Debussy: L’isle joyeuse

Rachmaninov: Prelude No. 12 in G-Sharp Minor

Schumann: Arabeske

Beethoven: Sonata No. 21 in C Major (“Waldstein”)

Free, no tickets necessary (a Shinkoskey Noon Concert)

Ann E. Pitzer Center, Davis, CA
Event

“No Future without Memory: A Nuclear Repertoire and Reproduction of the Senses”
Room 266, Everson Hall

God save the Queen
A fascist regime
They made you a moron
Potential H-bomb
God save the Queen
She ain’t no human being
There is no future
And England’s dreaming.

From the halls of the British Library to popular music conferences, the Sex Pistols’ “God Save the Queen” (1977) is emblematic of the punk genre and used in the institutionalization and celebration of punk’s 40th birthday. Fifty-five years ago, the first thermonuclear device (the H-bomb) was detonated by the United States in the Marshall Islands. The explosion was one of sixty-seven that has irrevocably altered the now sovereign Pacific Island nation. Today, Marshallese sing powerful songs that refuse the western cooptation of their future. These songs are called al in keememej (concerted memory songs) because there is no future without memory. This talk asks us to listen to the politics of sound reproduction in the nuclear era. I explore the ways anthropology of the senses and musicological work offer insight into how the bomb reproduces discriminatory systems that render some bodies “insensible” like the radiation absorbed by them. I also share how Marshallese and marginalized populations use music to effectuate a “memory of the senses” (Seremetakis) that are embodied and taught to younger generations. I take American governmental sound design, popular music, punk music, and Marshallese legal “hearings” and al in keememej, not as separate genres, but rather a tense nuclear repertoire through which sonic contestations of nuclear power often play out. I suggest that these contestations are rarely heard because of a neoliberal capitalist system that nuclear weaponry founds and is founded by. This system, made global by U.S. militarism, employs the bomb (hard power) and culture industries (soft power) that dialectically resolve in unequal gendered and racialized spaces at the sensible margins.

Jessica Schwartz (UCLA) approaches musical representations and sonic histories of militarization and imperial violence, affective alliances, and creative dissent through historical, ethnographic, and theoretical methods. Her work dialogs with American studies, Pacific studies, environmental anthropology, and indigenous studies, and she has begun to collaborate on projects relating to musical activism, artistic expression, and climate change in the Pacific. Other research interests include issues of musical transcription and analysis, critical pedagogies, race, class, and gender in respect to popular music from the postwar onwards and subcultural genres, such as punk and hip-hop. In 2013, Professor Schwartz co-founded and continues to serve as Cultural Programs Advisor to the Marshallese Educational Initiative, Inc., a non-profit organization based in Arkansas that raises cultural awareness of and promotes educational opportunities for the Marshallese population. An active guitarist, she composes and performs experimental noise-based and punk music.

Free, a Valente Lecture

Everson Hall, Davis, CA
Event

Resume Development

Location: Art Annex 107

Learn to make your resume stand out from the crowd, and the use of keywords to describe your experience, skills, and qualifications. Resume samples for each major in the Arts Group will be provided. Registration is not required.

***This workshop will count toward the mandatory requirement for seniors.***

Event

Baroque Orchestras of UC Davis and Davis High School
Recital Hall, Ann E. Pitzer Center

Telemann: Overture Burlesque

Handel: Concerto Grosso in F Major, op. 6 no. 2

Pez: Concert Sonata

Biber: Battaglia 

The relationship between UC Davis’s Barqoue Orchestra and Davis Senior High School provides a yearlong relationship of learning, exploration, and performance of Baroque and early classical orchestral music on instruments of those eras. Phebe Craig, Angelo Moreno (a UC Davis Music Alum), and Michael Sand are their directors.

$10 Students and Children, $20 Adults (Open Seating)

Ann E. Pitzer Center, Davis, CA
Event

Hannah Yan, piano
Recital Hall, Ann E. Pitzer Center

Works by J.S. Bach, Brahms, Prokofiev, and Schumann.

Free, no tickets necessary (a Junior Recital)

Ann E. Pitzer Center, Davis, CA
Event

Undergraduate Composers: Works for Piano
Recital Hall, Ann E. Pitzer Center

Free, no tickets necessary

Ann E. Pitzer Center, Davis, CA

View all UCD Arts departments and programs

Entity

Art
History

Entity

Art
Studio

Entity

Cinema and Digital Media

Entity

Design

Entity

Music

Entity

Theatre
and Dance

Entity

Performance Studies

Entity

Mondavi
Center

Entity

ARTS ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP

Entity

Home:
UC Davis Arts

Commands