General information

Spring Quarter, 2019

Course Description

AHI 001C: Baroque to Modern Art (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Introduction to visual analysis through study of western art 1600-present, examining major artists and movements from Europe to North America.  Study of the relationship of art and artists to political,religious, social change, and to changes in ideology, patronage, audience.  May be repeated for credit.

GE credit: ArtHum, Div | AH, VL, WC.

Course Description

AHI 001D: Arts of Asia (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Introduction to major forms and trends in the arts and material culture of Asia from the Neolithic to the contemporary emphasizing the visual manifestation of secular and religious ideas and ideals. Not open for credit to students who have completed course 1DV.

GE credit: ArtHum, Div | AH, WC, WE.  

Course Description

AHI 122: Sex and Space (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Relationship between space and sexuality. Sexual metaphors in art and architecture, gender identity formation via images and space. Diverse intersections of sexuality and art history.

GE credit: AH, DD, VL, WE.—F. (F.)

Course Description

AHI 163B: Chinese Painting (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours.  Thematic and chronological examination of Chinese painting and culture from the Tang Dynasty (7th c. CE) through the early 20th century.  Issues considered include political art (made to support or protest regimes), art and the market, art and individual expression.  Offered in alternate years.

GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt | AH, VL, WC, WE.

Course Description

AHI 173: Roman Art and Architecture (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Art and architecture of Rome and the Roman Empire, from the founding of Rome through the fourth century C.E.  (Same course as Classics 173.) Offered in alternate years.

GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt | AH, VL, WE.

Course Description

AHI 198: Pop Art India (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours; term paper. 

This course explores the popular arts of India spanning the past 150 years with an emphasis on the ways old myths and religious themes were radically reimagined through artistic new mediums such as trade labels, lithographs, religious prints, pulp magazines, comic books and early film. It considers how colonial domination, international commerce, technology and social critique shaped the production and consumption of modern popular arts of India. 

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